Monday, February 20, 2006

A Note of Thanks

Bellairsia
On the occasion of the fifth anniversary of Bellairsia we wanted to take a moment and say thank you to all the various people and organizations we have been in contact with regarding our John Bellairs project. We’ve tracked down some shaky leads and interviewed some enlightening people that we feel was time well spent and we look forward to what the next five years have in store for us – and just as importantly, all of John’s longtime fans.

Cheers.

Sunday, February 19, 2006

Time Capsule: Feb. 19, 1906

Kellogg's Corn Flakes
Battle Creek, Michigan, is celebrating the centennial of the founding of the Kellogg Company by brothers John and William Kellogg on February 19. The Kelloggs were trying to create a better-tasting alternative to the nutritious but bland bread served to patients at the Battle Creek Sanitarium and stumbled upon the corn flake. 

Bellairs spoofed his Michigan neighbors in The Mummy, the Will and the Crypt, introducing us to the health-nut patriarch of the Glomus family.

Tuesday, February 14, 2006

A Radio Reading of House

Camel's Hump Radio
You can listen to the ticking and the tocking of The House with a Clock in it Walls on Vermont Public Radio's Camel's Hump Radio. The program originally aired February 12, 2006, but there is a snippet of the book read by Thom Rivera available via VPR's website. Plus it covers our favorite scene - the chase scene (you know what we're talking about) - from chapter six, to boot! A well done reading and we love Mrs. Zimmermann’s accent.

Sunday, February 5, 2006

Grimoire: Curse of the Midions

Grimoire: Curse of the Midions
Amazon has revealed the cover art and a book description of Brad Strickland’s Grimoire: Curse of the Midions, due out later this year.

Memoriam: Al Lewis

Al Lewis as Mr. Gegenfurtner
The man behind the Grampa Munster mystique has died.  Actor Al Lewis was born in 1923 and began appearing on television in the late 1950s.  His first big break was on Car 54, Where Are You? (1961-63) but is fondly remembered by a generation of fans as Grandpa on The Munsters (1964-66).  Not only an actor, Lewis was active in politics and owned a restaurant in New York, appropriately called Grampa’s.